Multi-Year Developer Survey Reveals Evolving Practices and Foreshadows Further Change

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Dotfuscator CE

Published on September 12, 2018 by Sebastian Holst

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In 2017 and again in 2018, PreEmptive Solutions surveyed over 15,000 professional developers asking about their organization’s current and projected use of a broad cross-section of development languages and frameworks. 

Evaluating each annual survey result on its own and again together as a whole offers insights into current practices, assumptions about future trends as well as the actual trends that played out during the time between the two survey collection points.

The white paper, Multi-Year Developer Survey Reveals Evolving Practices and Foreshadows Further Change shows a professional development community striving to reduce the number of languages and frameworks they rely upon while simultaneously increasing their commitment and investments in the technologies they retain. As this maturation occurs, overall clarity and confidence in their architecture and mission improves. 

The ToC offers a glimpse into the specific topics covered.

Contents

Survey backgroundPage 1
Clarity increases by 21% year over yearPage 1
Java (non-Android) overall usage declines while Android expansion continues to acceleratePage 2
Java (non-Android)Page 2
Organizations with strategic commitments to Java moving quickly to “status quo”)Page 3
Android development is growing and forecasted growth is highPage 3
Organizations with strategic commitments to Android remain committed and positivePage 4
.NET Framework Classic maintains near saturation levels but developers sense a change is comingPage 5
Organizations with strategic commitments to .NET remain committed but cracks are showing here tooPage 6
Xamarin adoption rates are relatively flat but developer enthusiasm is unprecedentedPage 6
Strategic Xamarin development organizations project meteoric rise in Xamarin adoptionPage 7
ConclusionPage 8

Also, links to a summary of responses to all questions from both 2017 and 2018 surveys can be found in the conclusion.