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Risk Management

3 Common Security Mistakes Developers Make in Their SDLC

Reading Time: 4 minutes

The systems development lifecycle (SDLC) is a process used by developers to create and deploy software applications. The SDLC provides a framework for security, quality assurance, and project management throughout the software development process. Security is of paramount importance in the SDLC, as developers must ensure that their applications are secure from attacks.

Quality assurance is also critical, as developers must ensure that their applications meet customers’ expectations. Project management is essential to the success of the SDLC, as it helps developers track their progress and ensure that they meet their deadlines. By following the SDLC, developers can create high-quality, secure software applications that meet customers’ expectations.

When it comes to developing software, the security of the final product should be a top priority. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. Security is often an afterthought, which can lead to vulnerabilities and exploits. 

3 Most Common Security Mistakes That Developers Make When It Comes to Cybersecurity

When it comes to developing software, the security of the final product should be a top priority. Security should be integrated into every stage of the SDLC, from initial planning to post-deployment. Here are three common mistakes developers make when it comes to security in their SDLC.

1. Not Using Software Security Tools to Prevent Cyberattacks

The first common mistake many developers make is failing to use the proper software security tools to prevent cyberattacks. They often try to develop their own tools or use free ones that are ineffective. This can lead to vulnerabilities in the code, which hackers can exploit.

Using software security tools can help developers find and fix vulnerabilities in their code, making it more difficult for hackers to capitalize on them. These tools can also help automate the process of checking and fixing vulnerabilities in the code, saving time and resources.

Different software security tools have varying roles in the SDLC. Some help identify potential security risks, some write secure code, and others test code for vulnerabilities. In-app protection tools assist in securing the app post-development. It is crucial to prioritize security at every stage of the SDLC to ensure that risks are appropriately mitigated and that the final product is secure.

There are many different software security tools available that can help prevent attacks. These tools can help find and fix vulnerabilities in the code. They can also help monitor the system for suspicious activity and block attacks.

PreEmptive offers a variety of  in-app protection tools that can be used throughout the software development lifecycle to secure code, aid in app hardening. and mitigate vulnerabilities. PreEmptive tools are designed to work with a variety of programming languages and platforms, making them versatile for developers. Whether a developer is looking to protect mobile apps, web apps, or desktop apps,  PreEmptive tools can help them secure the code and prevent vulnerabilities from arising.

2. Failing to Use Source-Code Analysis Tools

The second mistake developers often make is failing to use source-code analysis tools. These tools can help identify vulnerabilities in the code and provide recommendations for fixing them. Many developers are not  aware of these tools or do not use them properly. This can lead to serious security issues that could otherwise be avoided.

Source-code analysis tools can be used to find a variety of issues, including buffer overflows, SQL injection, and cross-site scripting. They can also help find vulnerabilities in third-party libraries. By using these tools, developers can find and fix vulnerabilities before hackers exploit them.

Source-code analysis aims to improve the security of an application by identifying potential vulnerabilities during the development process. Security issues can often be found in the code itself, so it makes sense to look for them early on.

Source-code analysis can be used at different stages of the SDLC. For example, it can be used to identify potential security risks during the requirements-gathering phase. During the design phase, it can also be used to ensure that security is built into the system, and it can be used during the testing phase to find any vulnerabilities that may have been introduced during development.

Once the source code is analyzed, the findings can be used to improve the security of the application. For example, if a potential vulnerability is found, the code can be fixed to prevent it from being exploited. Alternatively, if a security issue is found in a third-party library, the application can be redesigned to avoid using that library. The application can then be submitted to the  in-app software protection tools offered by PreEmptive for app hardening.

3. Not Doing Security Testing in All Phases of the SDLC

The third mistake that many developers make is not doing security testing in all phases of the SDLC. Security testing should be done throughout the entire process, from initial planning to post-deployment.  Security testing can help find and fix vulnerabilities in the code. It can also help ensure that the application is configured correctly and meets all security requirements.

Security testing can be done manually or with automated tools. Automated tools can help speed up the process and find more issues than manual testing. Security testing should be done regularly, even after the application has been deployed.

In most cases, security testing is treated as an afterthought, to be done right before the app goes live. Security testing in the earlier stages of development can help find and fix issues before they become a problem. Security testing should be done throughout the entire SDLC to ensure that the application is secure.


Conclusion

Cybersecurity threats are increasing in number and sophistication every day. Developers who want to stay ahead of the curve need to use the latest software security tools to prevent cyberattacks. While developers can make many potential mistakes in their SDLC, we’ve highlighted the three most common ones. Implementing security within the SDLC is critical to protecting applications from cyberattacks and data breaches.

PreEmptive offers high-quality, highly flexible, smart application protection, including app hardening, to a wide variety of industries, protecting and securing applications for a broad range of platforms, including .NET, Java/Android, JavaScript, and iOS.  Take a look at PreEmptive’s solutions today and see how they can help improve the application security posture.


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Risk Management

PCI DSS 4.0 Regulation Framework Requirements

Reading Time: 5 minutes

Payment card industry (PCI) compliance is vital to the security and success of any business that takes credit card payments from customers. Failure to comply results in considerable losses of money and customer trust. 

To achieve compliance, businesses must meet a set of data security standards (DSS), a framework that outlines the steps necessary to protect customers’ data. PCI DSS applies to all organizations that collect, store, and transmit credit card information. 

Maintaining full compliance was recently complicated by the fact that PCI DSS was updated, with version 4.0 issued on March 31, 2022. It is the first significant overhaul of the system since 2014 and will remain in place until 2024, so understanding the requirements is urgent. 

Requirements for PCI DSS Compliance

PCI DSS is founded on 12 requirements that merchants must meet in order to be considered compliant. 

  • Installation and maintenance of network security controls 
  • Application of secure configurations to all system components
  • Protection of stored account data
  • Use of strong cryptography to transmit cardholder data over public networks 
  • Protection of systems and networks from malicious software
  • Development and maintenance of secure systems and applications
  • Restricted access to cardholder data 
  • Identification and authentication of users to access system components
  • Restricted physical access to cardholder data
  • Monitoring and logs of all access to network resources and cardholder data
  • Regular testing of security systems and processes
  • Establishment and maintenance of a policy to address information security

While these requirements may seem overwhelming, getting started is at least fairly straightforward. First, businesses must determine their PCI DSS merchant level. The level depends on the number of annual Visa transactions. For example, a merchant that processes over six million transactions is a level one merchant while a business that only processes one million is a level four. It is also possible for a merchant’s level to be elevated after a security breach. 

After determining the appropriate level, merchants need to fill out a self-assessment questionnaire from the PCI Security Standards Council website. This will help determine how well a company is complying with the regulations. 

At this point, businesses should build secure networks based on the questionnaire answers. Finally, they complete an attestation of compliance (AOC) to verify that they have met the necessary standards. 

Changes to PCI DSS 4.0

As a whole, the goal of the updates for version 4.0 of PCI DSS was to make the standards more flexible and accommodate different data and payment security strategies. The changes also help to stay on top of new threats and changes in technology. 

For example, the standards no longer refer exclusively to firewalls and routers. Instead, they reference network security controls to acknowledge the use of security measures outside of firewalls. 

Additionally, the PCI DSS scope is broader and now includes service providers who might impact the cardholder data environment (CDE), even if they are not directly processing the data. Likewise, rather than focusing on specific technologies, the scope for PCI DSS now includes any and all systems that have the potential to affect account data.

One other important shift to note is that encryption is not enough to ensure a business or any of its systems is compliant. The scope of compliance might be more limited if the system or entity is unable to decrypt data and doesn’t perform any encryption activities, but there is no total exemption from the standards on this basis.

Consequences for Failed Compliance 

Although PCI DSS compliance might seem burdensome and expensive, the consequences for failed compliance are severe. In addition to lawsuits and losses in profits, businesses with PCI DSS violations face significant fines ranging anywhere from $5,000 to $100,000 per month. These fines are passed down the line from card brands to payment processors, generally landing in the laps of the merchants. 

On top of the financial costs are losses to reputation, canceled partnerships with banks and other businesses, and suspension from processing transactions. Security failures and breaches in the past have shown just how serious the impact can be.

Target

One of the best-known examples of an enormous data failure is Target. In 2013, Target lost data for 40 million credit card numbers. Investigators found that, although the company had an excellent tool for malware detection, critical warnings were ignored for a number of weeks. 

As a result of their failure to comply, Target had to face one of the most tangible consequences: enormous financial losses. This came in the form of $18.5 million in settlements for affected customers in the United States and more than $202 million in legal fees. 

Because of its size, Target survived its data breach, but the financial security of small businesses is reliant on avoiding these kinds of events. The cost of implementing the necessary security measures pales in comparison to the potential losses of failed compliance. 

Warner Music Group 

A lesser-known but more recent example is Warner Music Group, which was unknowingly under siege for three months in 2020. From April to August, attackers gained access to the data of customers. 

The affected data included names, email addresses, billing addresses, credit card numbers, and CVC and CVV codes. As a result, Warner sent a notification to all customers stating that their personal information might have been captured in the breach. 

One of the immediate financial impacts on Warner was the cost of their offer of 12 months of free identity monitoring. However, the damage is unlikely to stop there. Ongoing class-action lawsuits have not yet been settled, and one of the major points of contention from the claimants is that the company failed to notice that its data was being attacked for such a long period of time. 


Supporting Security and Compliance

PCI DSS compliance is critical for businesses and the results of failed compliance are long-lasting and costly. One of the requirements for compliance is using outside sources to assess vulnerabilities in app security. 

Businesses can ensure that they meet this requirement by including payment app security from the outset. Automated security controls from PreEmptive can identify threats and help merchants meet these and other evolving regulations. 

PreEmptive is a leader in app hardening and shielding that defends against attacks on multiple platforms. This helps assure compliance and keeps private customer data out of the hands of malicious hackers.

The past has shown that application security is a worthwhile investment. PreEmptive’s products offer app hardening solutions for any merchant or business in need of the strongest and most reliable security.    


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101

Budgeting for DevSecOps: Key Points To Keep in Mind In Cybersecurity

Reading Time: 5 minutes

Cybersecurity is one of the areas of business that should never be ignored. Experts expect that cyberattacks will cost the world an estimated $10.5 trillion dollars in losses by 2025, making it an urgent priority for companies across every sector to get right. Not only can cyberattacks have a devastating impact on a company’s bottom line by leading to data breaches and other problems, they can also damage an organization’s reputation beyond repair. If a business fails to take the necessary time to address cybersecurity needs in its budget, it takes a significant risk that could cost them significantly if something goes wrong. 

Knowing how to budget for cybersecurity isn’t always easy. There’s more that goes into it than just buying software and hardware. Training staff and developing a culture of security within an organization must also be included.

Read on to find out how companies can make sure their cybersecurity budget meets their needs.

Know the Threat Landscape

Knowing the threat landscape is about knowing one’s enemy. Understanding what types of attacks are being used and by whom can help businesses better plan their security strategy. As malware authors continually evolve their approach, it’s crucial to stay informed about new threats and how they are being used.

In practical terms, that means:

  • Proactively monitoring the latest cyber attacks, including those identified by researchers at leading cybersecurity firms
  • Learning about new hacking and attack methods and vulnerabilities as soon as possible after their discovery
  • Maintaining up-to-date cyber protection on all systems with an internet connection

Companies should develop an acute awareness of the different attack vectors and vulnerabilities likely to affect their organization. Good managers will place themselves in the mind of an attacker and war game ways to overcome their own defenses. Would they implant Trojan viruses, or could they instead target one of the system administrators with phishing emails?

The conclusions that emerge will determine where and how the budget should be prioritized.

Don’t Just Think of One Single Network Perimeter

The best defense is a good offense, and this is especially true when it comes to cybersecurity. Businesses need to be proactive. The hackers are always working on newer, more advanced methods of attack, so defenders should plan for the future as a whole, not just threat parameters across one single network. They need a multilayered approach that will keep their network protected from threats internal and external alike.

Many breaches happen because companies are far too complacent with their cybersecurity measures. They rely too much on one single aspect of DevSecOps. But cyber attackers are getting smarter by the day: Defenders need to be flexible and adaptive.

Avoid Going Overboard

The point here is that cybersecurity budgets, like any other budget, should be managed with care. In determining the right amount to spend on cybersecurity in your organization, think about:

  • Risk Assessment. How high is the risk? What assets are most critical to protecting? What could happen if they were lost or compromised?
  • Cost. How much would it cost to recover from a breach? The more severe the potential financial damage, the more money businesses should consider directing toward cybersecurity.
  • Existing Controls. What defenses are already in place? If a company already has an extensive network of firewalls and intrusion detection systems, it may not need as much investment in additional security measures as another company.

Don’t budget more than is actually needed. The goal is to ensure that the right security measures are place to protect the organization. They don’t have to be the most expensive or sophisticated engineering solutions available.  They just need to work.

Think About the Cost of Underinvesting

The average data breach costs around $4 million, and this is just for the costs incurred directly by the victim. The real cost takes into consideration lost revenue and reputational damage.

Depending on the severity of the breach, businesses may be left dealing with an immediate loss of customer trust and reputation or even litigation from customers. It can also cause them to lose out on future business if customers don’t trust them with their money or personal information anymore.

Needless to say, no company can afford to take DevSecOps lightly.

Cybersecurity Is a Process, Not a Product

Cybersecurity should be a team effort that involves many people and departments throughout an organization. From the executive level to IT professionals to customer support personnel, everyone needs to be involved in cybersecurity efforts for the entire organization  to succeed.

It’s not enough for a network security team to just deploy their solution. Everyone needs to know how those solutions work and how they should be implemented. This includes ensuring that all new hires are trained on how these security solutions operate, so that everyone at the company understands and emphasizes cybersecurity in every aspect of their jobs.

They don’t need to know minute technical details, but they do need to understand the culture of cybersecurity and why it matters for their specific role in the company.

Budgeting Thoughtfully for Cybersecurity

Cybersecurity is a complex and ever-evolving field. To protect a business from cyber threats, cybersecurity defenders need to stay up to date on the latest security trends and technologies. But implementing good data hygiene practices takes time. There’s no quick fix for making sure all files have been properly encrypted or deleted.

  • Treat cybersecurity as a long-term investment. Cybersecurity isn’t something that can be put off until later — it’s an investment that can save businesses money long-term, but it’s also important to be thoughtful about how much it will cost and how best to spend that money.
  • Think beyond traditional IT solutions. Cybersecurity requires different skills than traditional IT, so don’t expect an existing IT staff to handle everything on their own. Businesses will also want someone who understands how human behavior affects security to help design processes that reduce the risk of someone inadvertently doing something that puts the company at risk.

Finding the Right Solution

One way for businesses to make sure their budgeting is on track is to work with someone who understands what kinds of threats exist and can give them realistic timelines for deploying effective solutions — and at what price point.


PreEmptive is committed to helping companies like yours protect their applications and networks from hackers, as well as ensuring that you are able to take control of your data. We offer free demos so you can see what we have to offer, and if you decide that our products are right for your business needs, we’ll be happy to work with you on a plan that fits within your budget.


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Risk Management

5 Ways PreEmptive Boosts Productivity in Your SDLC With DevSecOps

Reading Time: 5 minutes

Devsecops is quickly becoming instrumental for businesses that want to boost productivity. According to the 2021 GitLabs DevSecOps report, teams that use a devsecops approach to generating their code got their work out the door 60% faster than those that didn’t. That’s a massive improvement in efficiency and productivity.

You can reap the same rewards by taking a devsecops approach early in your systems development lifecycle (SDLC). Keep reading to learn the five most important ways that early devsecops implementation can streamline your SDLC and what it means to take a devsecops approach.

What Is DevSecOps?

DevSecOps

The term devsecops is short for “development, security, operations.” It’s the next evolution of the “devops” culture and approach to development. In DevOps, the development and operations teams work together closely to ensure that the program is designed from the ground up to meet functionality goals and deadlines. 

Devsecops goes one step further by rolling the security team into the development process. Instead of having a DevOps group and a Security group, everyone on the project is responsible for ensuring it’s secure. This helps prevent fundamental security flaws from being baked into the final product and reduces the risk of costly security fixes after development is complete. 

Building a devsecops culture within your business helps you accomplish this by providing five main benefits. When your team is dedicated to pursuing devsecops goals throughout the SDLC, you can:

1. Improve Communication

The traditional approach to application development involves siloed teams. Each part of the development process is handled by separate groups. These groups don’t typically work together and only communicate about the project when it’s moved from one team to the next. As a result, communication delays are common, and miscommunications can cause problems that take weeks to resolve. 

Taking a devsecops approach can resolve this issue entirely. Instead of having siloed teams working separately, everyone is working on it at the same time. The group can easily communicate and bring up potential problems in advance, saving time and effort in the long run. 

You can further improve communication about security concerns by implementing security solutions in your application from the very beginning. PreEmptive makes it easy for everyone on your team to ensure the app is secure, including non-specialists. Everyone can communicate in the same language and avoid delays since they’re all working with the same tools.

2. Implement Early Testing

Devsecops allows you to start performing critical tests early before it becomes cost-prohibitive to make essential changes. There’s no need to wait until the project is nearing completion to send it to the security team. Since everyone is responsible for security, and protective features and architecture should be included from the very start, it’s possible to start security testing significantly earlier in your SDLC. 

Working with a tool like PreEmptive makes early testing easier to accomplish. You don’t need to reinvent the wheel or worry about whether your tests will miss something. You can simply verify that the PreEmptive hardening features are working as intended. 

This early testing can significantly improve your team’s productivity. You can catch potential flaws and risks right away when they can be fixed in hours or days. The result is less time wasted on preventable fixes and more time spent on features that matter.

3. Incorporate Security Into Metric Monitoring

Many teams monitor productivity metrics to determine how well they’re performing. When you’ve built a devsecops security culture, you can include your security teams in your monitoring process to understand how your project is going. 

This holistic overview helps you spot places where you’re inefficient. You can quickly address delays or redundant processes and refine your SDLC to reach peak performance. 

4. Integrate Shared Knowledge

Another benefit of devsecops culture is the way it encourages sharing knowledge. A well-structured devsecops approach means that everyone does a little of everything. Having team members share their knowledge ensures that the loss of one person won’t derail an entire project. Someone else will have a basic understanding of what needs to be done to keep things moving. 

Furthermore, this team culture can benefit your project as a whole. Collaboration between groups with different skill sets leads to more robust, secure projects, particularly when they have high-quality tools to work with. Providing shared security tools like PreEmptive reinforces this knowledge transfer and collaboration, making your final product even better. 

5. Institute Automation

A quality devsecops team will prioritize the use of automation. When your development and security teams are one and the same, it’s easy to build high-quality security automation from the beginning of your SDLC. This can make all the difference down the road. 

Security automation includes attributes like:

  • Obfuscation: Protecting sensitive information and code through renaming, encryption, and minification.
  • Tamper detection: Identifying and shutting down outside attempts to adjust your application without permission.
  • Control-flow: Ensuring that outside forces can’t affect the commands issued within your application.

The sooner these features are built into an application, the less likely it is to contain major security flaws. Devsecops ensures that you can bake in automated security protection while your app is still in early development.

PreEmptive makes it easy to automate your app’s security from the moment your team begins work. It’s as easy as adding your chosen solution to your app, with no need to send your sensitive or protected code to a third party at any point. You get the benefits of automated security and regular updates while keeping your code in-house.


Make DevSecOps Easier With PreEmptive

It’s never too early to start thinking about application protection and security. Devsecops is the best way to make sure your app is secure from the moment you begin development. 

If you want to make devsecops a fundamental part of your SDLC, PreEmptive makes it simple. By adding a PreEmptive security solution like DashO, JSDefender, or Dotfuscator to your app, you ensure that security is baked into your design. Learn more about how PreEmptive can help you accomplish your security goals, or start your free trial today. 


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Risk Management

Common Mistakes Developers Do When Building Apps

Reading Time: 5 minutes

With the rapid rate at which new apps are popping up, it goes without saying that app development is becoming increasingly popular. Over 143 billion apps were downloaded in 2021 alone. However, not all apps garner the success their developers may have initially hoped to achieve. Many end up getting uninstalled after their first use.

The competitive market is partly to blame for this. But mistakes that occur during the application development process are to blame as well. Here, we’ll go over eight of the most common mistakes developers make so that you can avoid them and position your app for success. 

1. Skipping Over Research

After coming up with or hearing an idea for an app, many developers want to dive right into bringing the vision to life. However, rushing in without research can lead to numerous issues and wasted money. 

Successfully developing and marketing an app relies on user research. Is there a need for the app? If so, who is the target audience — what are their demographics? And what are their typical behaviors and motivations?

Competitor research is also critical. If they’re also developing an app — or if they already have one — then keeping tabs on what they’re up to will help you create something unique and appealing. 

2. Striving to Create a “Perfect” App

There’s nothing wrong with wanting to create a great app that users will love. In fact, that’s usually the point. There’s no such thing as a “perfect” app, though. Trying to create something that’s free of all flaws could lead to a never-ending development cycle. Ultimately, you may never launch it. 

That doesn’t mean you can’t strive to develop an app that continues to improve over time. One way to do this is by creating a minimum viable product or MVP. An MVP is a version of an app that only includes the essential features it needs to work. You can then release it to early adopters who can assess its functionality and performance. Their feedback allows you to create a better final product, avoid time and budget waste, and may even speed up the time to launch. 

3. Failure to Test Properly

Testing is a critical component of the software development lifecycle (SDLC). It ensures a smooth, pleasant user experience and helps developers squash “bugs” before launch. The problem is that several challenges still exist

There are several strategies for dealing with common testing challenges. Here are a few that may help:

  • Develop a solid testing process that includes how often you’ll test an app and who will do it. 
  • Consider using in-house and outsourced testing experts. 
  • Make sure you have all of the proper tools to run tests.
  • Make sure there’s ample time to devote to testing (schedule it if you have to). 

4. Creating a Poor User Experience

It’s not uncommon for developers to get so entrenched in the development process that they forget about how users will interact with an app. Unfortunately, that mistake can be costly. A poor user experience is one of the top reasons people uninstall apps. 

Several issues can impact an app’s user experience, including:

  • Slow loading speeds
  • Difficult to navigate (it takes too many clicks for users to find what they need)
  • Unnecessary log-in pages
  • Intrusive ads
  • Low-quality content
  • Boring design

An essential consideration for a good user experience? The user! Put yourself in their shoes when assessing the overall experience. The feedback you get from your MVP version can come in handy, too.  

5. Trying to Squeeze Too Many Features and Functions Into the App

Unique features and functions that serve a purpose for app users are great. Trying to squeeze in too many, however, can be detrimental. 

For one thing, the more features you add, the more expensive the project becomes. Excessive features can bog the app down, hindering its performance and ruining the user experience. The app can also become too large and require too much space on users’ phones.

When determining what features to add to an app, consider if they’re necessary first. Leave out the ones that don’t offer any value. If you start hearing a call for specific features from users, you can add and optimize them later. 

6. Building for Every Possible Platform

You might feel tempted to develop your app for every possible platform right out of the gate. After all, it’s a surefire way to attract more users.

But trying to tackle multiple platforms from the start could quickly destroy your budget. It can also be incredibly time-consuming. Instead, consider starting with one platform — basing your decision on market research — and expanding to others after your initial launch. 

That doesn’t mean you can’t develop an app for more than one platform to start. Make sure that you have a cross-platform strategy, though. For instance, you could use a single source code on a cross-platform app development tool to deploy on Android and iOS devices. 

7. Ignoring Feedback 

Feedback has come up a couple of times already. Listening to what your app users have to say is critical for building an app that they want to use. It’s about more than just listening, though. It’s also about using that feedback to improve your app with each update. Along with eliminating pain points for your users, using customer input lets them know you care. That’s one of the best ways to earn their loyalty. 

What happens if you don’t listen? User satisfaction decreases, and people start uninstalling your app in favor of something else.

8. Neglecting the Importance of Security

A recent survey found that 86% of developers don’t view security as a top priority when writing code. Half of the respondents also said they wouldn’t be able to guarantee their code to be safe from common vulnerabilities. 

Hackers don’t only attack websites. Some can reverse engineer mobile apps to inspect them while they work or capture communications between an app and server. They can also use code-based attacks to steal data, get around security checks, or compromise your app’s integrity. 

Prioritizing security is a must. One way to do this is with comprehensive mobile app protection with PreEmptive. Applying a layered approach, PreEmptive Protection uses obfuscation, encryption, tamper-proofing, and more to make your apps more difficult for potential hackers to exploit. It integrates seamlessly into your build process and requires no code changes. Best of all, it goes wherever your apps go. 


Avoid Common Mistakes for Better Apps People Love to Use

App development can be a time-intensive and sometimes frustrating process. Even the best developers make mistakes from time to time. Understanding the most common ones can help you avoid them or manage them more effectively if they do happen. 

If you’re looking for ways to make your apps more secure, PreEmptive is here to help. Visit our products page for more information about our app protection, or check out our resources to see what else we can do for you!