Categories
Risk Management

3 Ways Financial Service Organizations Can Improve Mobile App Security

Reading Time: 5 minutes

Finance mobile apps usage is rapidly accelerating, with the number of user sessions increasing by 49% in 2020. VMware reports that cyberattacks on financial apps also rose by 118% during the same year. 

Another report by Intertrust reveals that 77% of financial services apps include at least one security vulnerability that could lead to a data breach. Recently a new Trojan virus called SOVA has been found targeting financial banking apps by encrypting the Android phone and asking for a ransom to decrypt afterward. 

Cybercriminals look for maximum impact and profit, making financial apps a potential target. Therefore, it is imperative to adopt certain measures to improve mobile app security during the development process. 

Challenges to Financial App Security and How To Avoid Them

 

Making financial applications resilient to cyberattacks is a must security practice. During app development, you can improve security by avoiding the following mistakes:

→ Not Validating Data

 

Not validating user input can make your financial app an easy target for hackers. They can easily enter harmful codes or malicious commands that can cause a data breach. 

Therefore, you must validate data by checking its format, length, permissible characters, minimum and maximum value, etc. This way, the app will only accept the user data you want. 

Weak or No Encryption

 

If you are storing or sending data with weak or no encryption, hackers can easily access and use it for nefarious means. Therefore encrypt all data that you transmit or store so even if hackers download it, they won’t be able to access it. 

Most developers focus on the client side of app security and don’t pay much attention to the server side. This can compromise confidential data, such as credit card information stored on the server. 

The solution is to include a reliable secure sockets layer (SSL) and high-level encryption in your app security practices. This will boost server-side security.

A tool like DashO can provide layered protection for your financial Android and Java apps. Layering makes it impossible for hackers to gain access to sensitive information. 

Another excellent app security practice is to use encryption protocols like SHA256 and AES. Also, never store the encryption keys on the application. 

Not Validating User Authentication 

 

Permitting users to set any password they want is risky because hackers try different combinations of characters to gain access to passwords by brute force. 

You can avoid this by including validation for setting passwords and locking users out of their accounts after a few incorrect login attempts. Also, set up multi-factor authentication for the app. 

Cached Confidential Information 

 

Caching confidential information saves time for users as it allows them to log in instantly without entering data. However, it also puts them at risk of breach. If the device gets stolen, anyone can log into the app.

The solution is to include conditions to prevent confidential information from getting cached automatically.

→ Skipping Penetration Testing

 

Penetration testing allows you to know about security vulnerabilities in real-time. Research by Informa Tech conducted on companies with 3000 or more employees shows that 69% of organizations perform penetration testing to prevent data breaches.

Due to deadlines, shortages, or other reasons, developers usually skip this step and release the app, which puts users at risk. No matter how short the delivery deadline is, perform many penetration tests on your app. This will help you find security flaws and fix them during the development process.

3 Ways to Improve Financial App Security During the Development Process

Following these best security practices will improve app security during the development process:

1.  Using Multi-Tiered Authentication

 

A token is a security unit that authenticates a user’s identity by storing personal information transmitted between applications and websites. Financial app developers should use tokens to monitor user sessions. 

These tokens can be approved or withdrawn. Also, design the app to accept medium-to-strong passwords containing alphanumeric characters. These passwords should be renewed regularly, let’s say after every six months. 

Adding a one-time password (OTP) system for each login session will make sign-ups more secure. A multi-factor authentication (MFA) system, including a combination of a retina scan and biometric print, will level up your app security. While hackers can crack passwords through brute force, the biometric factor will foil their attack.

Many security regulations also call for implementing MFA, so you’ll also have a better posture at compliance. Moreover, the user login process can be simplified by using MFA. Once you authenticate users, you can reward them with Single Sign-On (SSO), where they can use multiple services on a single login.

2. Use of Authorized API

 

Always use an authorized application programming interface (API) in your financial app code. To gain maximum security in the app development process, you must have centralized authorization for the whole API. As apps are installed on mobile phones, they are less secure. 

Hackers can install their own app on a device they control and easily manipulate the financial app to take advantage of its security vulnerabilities. API calls are usually protected by an API key and user credentials as an access token. 

You can secure your APIs when they access third-party platforms by using digital signatures, encrypting data, quotas, API gateways, and throttling. 

3. Real-Time Threat Detection

 

In the past, organizations would get to know about a security lapse in their apps after a considerable time. Now they are increasingly focusing on building real-time threat detection capabilities.

The reasons are that early detection can help retrieve stolen information promptly, and regulations require businesses to report a breach quickly. A company‘s reputation suffers if it takes a long time to detect and respond to a security violation.

Therefore, if you develop a real-time threat detection system for your app, you can take preventative measures against developing ransomware and patch vulnerabilities. Moreover, you can use a tool like Dotfuscator for .NET that provides app security in real-time by updating its protection regularly to counter cyberattacks.


Bottom Line

App hardening

Given the sophistication of cyberattacks on financial apps, the financial industry cannot solely rely on a single security practice. When developing an app, it is crucial to ensure that it complies with data privacy regulations and is not susceptible to cyberattacks. 

Adopting a solution consisting of real-time intelligence, multi-user authentication, database security, and authorized API is vital for mobile app security. But remember following the best security practices for financial apps requires considerable expertise. 

Tools like PreEmeptive can assist you with app security by offering a smart app protection solution against reverse engineering, unauthorized debugging, and snooping. 

We use a layered approach, including encryption, root detection, obfuscation, shielding, and tamper-proofing to prevent hackers from exploiting your data. Learn more on our product page.


 

Categories
JSDefender Change Log

JSDefender Change Log V2.6 Build 0 – Release Date Nov 01, 2022

Reading Time: < 1 minute

Change Log – Version 2.6.0 – Release Date Nov 01, 2022

Features

  • upgrade webpack support to version 5.74.0
Categories
101

Hacker Horror Stories to Frighten Dev Teams This Halloween

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Halloween is a time for ghosts, ghouls, and other frightening things. But ask any cybersecurity professional if they’re more scared of hockey masks and chainsaws or hackers and malware, and most will take their chances with the slashers. Truly, few things are more terrifying than when data security is compromised. 

Customer information, reputation, credibility, the outlook for the future — all of those things come into question when hackers and attackers infiltrate. It’s the thing of nightmares and, unfortunately, it happens more often than you think.

In fact, some estimates place the total at 109 million accounts that were breached in the third quarter of 2022 alone. That’s a 70% jump over the previous quarter. Yikes! And while no breach is minor, sometimes the magnitude of the breach, who it affects, and the costs and outcomes are especially jaw-dropping.

So to finish out Cybersecurity Awareness Month, let’s look at a few especially terrifying hacker horror stories that are sure to spook you!

 

Hackers Breach the Red Cross

It’s bad enough when hackers target businesses, but something about going after the charitable organizations that help people seems especially egregious. That happened in January of this year when hackers attacked servers operated by the Red Cross, which contained data about Restoring Family Links services, which works to reconnect people separated by war, migration, and violence. The personal information of a half million people was exposed.

 

 

Disgruntled Employee Goes After Cash App

It’s one thing when hacks and attacks come from the outside – those are to be expected. But when a person within an organization betrays their position to compromise security? That type of inside job is hard to protect against. Cash App found out the hard way in April this year when a former employee breached data containing customer names, stock information, account numbers, and portfolio information, along with a lot of other sensitive financial information. Eight million customers had to be notified about the occurrence!

Russia’s Warfare Has Cyber Element

Few things are more horrific than war. And the conflict that’s on everyone’s mind is what’s going on in Ukraine. The violence on the ground is bad enough, but Russian hackers have also taken to launching cyber attacks against the power grid in Ukraine, nuclear facilities, and a lot more.

 

Personal Health Information Leaked

Australia has had an especially difficult 2022 when it comes to cyber attacks, and many organizations have found themselves in compromising situations. Among the worst was when the personal health information of almost a quarter million people was leaked. In this case, not only were clients put at risk, but the company itself, Australian Clinical Labs Ltd., saw its share price fall as a result.

Hackers Hit the Bar

Having a glass of wine (in moderation) is a commonly practiced way to temporarily forget about problems like data breaches and security leaks. Well, not for customers of iDealwine. The online wine merchant just recently reported that they’d been the victim of a data breach that has potentially exposed the information of every single one of their customers.

Former Uber Exec Covered Up Data Breach

Imagine facing nearly a decade in federal prison for a hack you didn’t even commit. That’s what happened when former Uber Chief Security Officer Joseph Sullivan was found guilty in federal court of not disclosing a 2016 breach of customer and driver records to regulators and attempting to cover up the incident. He is looking at a possible maximum of five years in prison for the obstruction charge, and a maximum of three years for the other charge. It doesn’t get much worse than that.

 


PreEmptive Protects Applications From Hackers

 

Maintaining data security in today’s world requires a comprehensive approach and constant vigilance. No single habit does it all, nor is sometimes often enough. Whether it’s simply regularly changing your passwords and practicing good password hygiene, or implementing a full-fledged, enterprise-level security program.

When it comes to helping software developers create secure products, PreEmptive is a trusted global leader of protection tools for Desktop, Mobile, Cloud, and Internet of Things (IoT) applications. We help organizations make their applications more resistant and resilient to hacking and tampering so that protecting intellectual property, sensitive data, and revenue is achievable.

Want to learn more about our products and if they’re right for you? Contact us for a complimentary security consultation.

 


 

Categories
Risk Management

Cybersecurity Awareness Month: Changing Your Passwords

Reading Time: 4 minutes

October is Cybersecurity Awareness Month, a month-long effort to raise awareness about the importance of practicing good habits to keep ourselves and our data safe. This year’s theme is “See Yourself in Cyber,” which is intended to communicate that cybersecurity isn’t complex; it’s all about people. And one of the most important things people can do to stay safe online is to practice good password hygiene. And what better time to start than by updating your passwords for Cybersecurity Awareness month.

 

Why You Should Practice Good Password Hygiene

Passwords are how we verify our identity. Whether it’s online banking, email, applications, or the countless other things in our daily lives that require a password, using sound practices to manage them is a must to keep your data safe and secure from prying eyes. Hackers look for situations with weak passwords; unfortunately, many people make it easy.

When was the last time you changed your email and social media passwords? What about your bank and household accounts? Experts say you should do it at least every three months. Do you use the same passwords for any accounts? If you’re shy about sharing your answers, you’re not alone. Many organizations have poor behavior around password management, and weak passwords cause at least 30% of security breaches. 

The 2021 Verizon Breach Investigations Report found that 80% of hacking-related breaches involved stolen or brute-forced credentials. But such aggressive approaches usually aren’t even required. For example, did you know that “Password” is the second most-used password in the United States? We can do a lot better than that.

How to Change & Manage Your Passwords for Cybersecurity Awareness Month

Each of us has over 80 passwords, and there are better ways to manage them than saving them in browsers, writing them on post-it notes, or reusing them for multiple accounts. In honor of Cybersecurity Awareness Month, we’re encouraging everyone to update their credentials. Below are strategies and habits that can ensure your passwords are secure.

Use a Password Manager

A password manager like LastPass or KeePass eliminates the need to memorize credentials or store them in a browser. With just one password you can can create and save passwords for all your accounts.

 

Create a Strong Password

Creating a strong password is a critical step to protecting yourself online. Using long, complex passwords is one of the easiest ways to defend yourself from data breaches and hacks.

 

Get Goofy

If you must create your passwords instead of using randomly generated examples, get creative. Phonetic replacements (“kc” instead of “k”), deliberate misspellings, and substituting letters with numbers and punctuation marks or symbols (such as @ instead of the letter “A”) can maintain security while allowing you to remember your password more easily.

 

Make It Hard to Guess

The National Institute of Standards and Technology provides several suggestions to promote password security, including not using personal information in your passwords. Kids’ names? Pets names? Address? Forget it. All of that information is easy for criminals to guess.

 

Don’t Tell Anyone Your Passwords

Never tell anyone your passwords. If someone calls you on the phone or emails you and says they’re with a service provider and need your passwords, hang up — it’s a scam. Additionally, do not keep written passwords out in plain sight.

 

Each Account Gets Its Own Password

 

Using the same password across multiple accounts is like giving attackers a master key that unlocks every door in your life. Do you really want to do that? Mix things up and use a distinctly unique password for each account. Password managers — which you should use — make it easy.

 

Double Your Protection With Two-Factor or Multi-Factor Authentication

 

Whenever an application allows you to use multi-factor authentication (MFA), do it. It’s another way to ensure that the only person with access to your account is you.

 

Other Strategies to Stay Safe Online

 

Practicing good password hygiene all the time is something every one of us needs to do. But it’s also just one component of cybersecurity. You can arm yourself with multiple layers of protection by following these other practices promoted during Cybersecurity Awareness Month.

 

  • Think before you click. If a link looks off, don’t click. It could be an attempt to steal information or install malware. 
  • Update your software. Got a software update notification? Install it immediately. Even better, turn on automatic updates.
  • Get more information. Want to see everything you can do? Get all the tips about cybersecurity at the official website.

PreEmptive Is Security

PreEmptive helps organizations make applications more resistant and resilient to hacking and tampering. We are a global leader in obfuscation tools for Desktop, Mobile, Cloud, and Internet of Things (IoT) applications. Our products balance ease of use, strength of protection, quality of output, ROI, and security.

Learn more about our products.

 


 

Categories
Risk Management

Friendly Reminder Why Source Control Matters

Reading Time: 4 minutes

All work — physical or digital — requires a specialized toolset to master the task at hand. One of the most helpful tools for program developers is source control management software. Now that the end of the year is approaching, projects will be coming to a close. However, many programmers forsake the implementation of source control management because they don’t understand the benefits of establishing standout coding practices and habits.

Whether the work is an individual project or a large team effort, source control helps track, manage, protect, and improve code in order to meet those end-of-year deadlines. Read further as we define it, highlight the challenges and emphasize the importance of Source Control. 

What Is Source Control?

In essence, source control is the process of storing and tracking changes and edits to a coding project from start to finish. To accomplish this, programmers often use source management systems, services designed to help coders save a detailed log of backups for each iteration of code. They also allow multiple DevOps team members to work and edit within a single version and make changes without getting in the way of others’ progress.

Selecting a source control management system isn’t easy. An abundance of tools are available, making it crucial for developers to research which ones best fit their needs.

Source Control Challenges

Remember: The absence of source control is an approach to source control. It’s also the worst approach. Failing to conduct source control methodically with the proper tools can be disastrous.

For example, trying to conduct a project without a systematized backup of previous versions makes it incredibly difficult to backtrack and identify errors. Additionally, without a proper source code management system, different coders won’t be able to work simultaneously within the codebase. This lack of collaboration increases the chances of miscommunication, errors, and frustration throughout each project. 

Although getting an entire team initiated with a new process and management system is often labor-intensive, it’s worth the commitment. Finding the right source control management system for a team’s work style is vital to long-term success. 

Reasons to Implement Source Control

From a birds-eye view, implementing a source control strategy is vital to a functioning and productive coding organization. Not only does it increase productivity, but it also increases safety and fosters collaboration. 

Increase Code Security

All DevOps teams know that the source code requires as much protection as possible. Therefore, instituting proper source control is crucial because it boosts security measures. 

All data is stored in a repository through the source control management system. The repository, which can be either a public or a private server, keeps each version in a safe and centralized cloud-based system.

Additionally, many systems also come with encryption protocols and application hardening. 

Track Changes and Defects

With source code construction, keeping an eye on every change is absolutely necessary for a project’s success. Management tools provide developers with dynamic ways to track and monitor all tweaks and edits. 

Many source control management solutions automatically alert users to a code’s detected vulnerabilities and defects. Because of this, coding teams prefer these systems — such as PreEmptive’s source control solution — because they analyze and identify issues throughout each version.

Foster Collaborative Code Building

Especially in team environments, synchronizing all collaborators within one version is an immense step to success. Source code management allows developers to work within one codebase and merge all of their changes in one central repository instead of pulling together multiple versions.

Working on the shared code allows the whole team to review, edit, and leave comments in the same place. The improved collaboration accelerates the code-building process and keeps everyone in the loop on the team’s progress. 

Store Backup Code

Source control management is also sometimes referred to as “version control.” This alternative title highlights the ability for programmers to go back and look at previous versions. 

This ability to store every version and go back in time is critical to productivity, as it can save hours, days, and even weeks of work when someone is trying to track down errors. 

Best Practices for Source Control Management

When a company is figuring out which source control management system best serves its needs, there are a handful of habits it can get the team into early to ensure a more successful transition. 

Find a System That Suits the Project’s Needs

Not all source control systems offer the same features. Because of this, it’s worthwhile to put in extra effort up front and nitpick over which solution best fits the necessities of the project. 

It’s important to investigate the competing security features, different access controls, and storage methods. 

Knowing the fine details up front helps avoid stress later on. Check out PreEmptive’s source control solutions to see whether the wide range of features can meet all of the project’s source management needs.

Maintain the Latest Version

Every code revision ensures the new code is pulled and stored within the system. Keeping versions of each code iteration may seem tedious, but tracking even the slightest changes can be extremely helpful. 

It’s recommended to save commits as often as possible, as storing many versions eliminates the need to second-guess the timing of changes and edits. 

Keep a Detailed Note Log

When saving and creating new versions of code, it’s wise to note every change — large or small. There’s nothing too insignificant to be tallied; promoting an organized source control process saves teams time when issues arise. 

Review All Changes

Every time a new code version is committed, the team should run a detailed review of all changes. Doing so reduces the likelihood of building on faulty code. 

If the source control management system offers automatic error detection, the team should address any issues that arise immediately. Quick action saves incorrect code from slipping through the cracks. 

Implement Source Control as Soon as Possible

There’s little reason any programming team should be without a sound system for managing its coding projects. As is evident, implementing the best source control management service brings immense benefits to the team’s productivity and the safety of the source code. 

Happy Coding everybody!

 


 

Categories
Support Corner

Protecting C# Applications That Use Friend Assemblies

Reading Time: 2 minutes

The internal keyword in C# restricts access of types and members to callers in the same assembly. The InternalsVisibleTo attribute is a special way to grant internals access to a “Friend” assembly. Friend assemblies are used when unit testing, as internal members must be directly invoked by a test DLL. So it is quite common to have several friend assemblies in our project.

 

Dotfuscator takes friend assemblies into consideration when applying protection settings. It follows a specific process to preserve runtime behavior while performing as much obfuscation as possible. It also notifies us of any potential issues with friend assemblies during the build.

 

Please consider the following example, a DLL has InternalsVisibleTo an EXE file:

 

 

The EXE file directly references an internal class, made possible only by adding the InternalsVisibleTo attribute in the DLL: 

When obfuscating only the DLL, one of the following warnings would be shown, depending on the Dotfuscator configuration:

 

WARNING: MyAssembly has non-input Friend Assemblies and is in Library Mode; internal members will not be renamed or pruned. Consider adding Friend Assemblies as input for increased obfuscation.

OR 

WARNING: MyAssembly has non-input Friend Assemblies and is not in Library Mode; internal members may be renamed or pruned. References from non-input Friend Assemblies to the internal members of MyAssembly may no longer be valid.

 

The first message occurs when Dotfuscator is run in Library Mode. In Library Mode, Dotfuscator will not rename public and protected members for reusability of obfuscated components (as with APIs). Because of the InternalsVisibleTo attribute, Dotfuscator will also skip the renaming of internals. This will result in less Rename obfuscation than we may have anticipated, but it also will not break any runtime behavior. 

 

The second message warns that Dotfuscator may rename internals in a way that could break calls from the friend assembly.  If the friend assembly is deployed with this obfuscated DLL, this could cause a runtime error. If the friend assembly is not deployed (as with a unit testing DLL) then this warning will have no runtime impact and can be disregarded.

 

In general, obfuscation works best when more parts of the application are obfuscated together. The above warnings will completely disappear if the friend assembly is included as Dotfuscator input. If this is not feasible, we can still process the assemblies in Library mode but with less obfuscation.

 

The full example can be downloaded here.


Be on the look out for our next Support Corner blog!

 

Categories
Risk Management

Be Aware of Frauds and Scams in the Wake of Hurricane Ian

Reading Time: 5 minutes

If natural disasters weren’t bad enough all by themselves, unfortunately, they also bring on frauds and scams. Here are some of the most common.

 

As we write this, Hurricane Ian slams the southeastern United States with category-four hurricane force. Not only are natural disasters and severe weather events devastating for the people most affected, but they also create a perfect storm, so to speak, for scammers and fraudsters to prey on both vulnerable and giving people.

 

We’re advocates for data security — all data. Electronic or otherwise. And we don’t want people in our community to be victimized by both the storm and con artists, so we compiled a list of common scams that appear during natural disasters so survivors of Hurricane Ian can identify suspicious behavior, avoid being a victim, and ideally, report it to the authorities.

 

Common Scams During Hurricane Season

Whenever a natural disaster strikes, many people need help, and just as many people want to help. But there are also unsavory types who try to profit off others’ misery and misfortune, especially during a crisis like a hurricane when things are chaotic and everything is thrown upside down — literally.. Whether you’re affected by Hurricane Ian or want to help people who are, below are scams to watch out for.

 

Disaster Relief Charity Scams

 

Unfortunately, fake charities seeking donations for disaster relief is one of the most common scams after a natural disaster. It’s incredibly easy for scammers to use phone number spoofing and social engineering to create a compelling story. If there is a charity to which you want to donate, do it through their official website after you verify their authenticity with the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance, Charity Navigator, Charity Watch, or GuideStar. The National Association of State Charity Officials can also tell you what charities are registered in your state.

 

Fake Representatives

 

After a disaster, some people pose as official disaster aid workers trying claiming to help survivors complete applications while asking for fees or claiming to need insurance information. Be aware that federal and state workers never ask for or accept money for federal disaster assistance and they always have proper identification and provide it readily. If any of these are amiss, it’s likely a scam.

 

Insurance Scams

 

If someone contacts you claiming to represent your insurance company, and asks for account numbers or any other personal information, hang up immediately and call your insurance company on the number provided on your monthly statement. You can continue your business if the call is legitimate (highly unlikely). If not, let them know that you received a scam call.

 

And if you’re a policyholder with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), reach them directly at 800-638-6620. Never give any personal information to anyone who calls you and claims to be with the NFIP.

 

Contractors and Home Improvement Scams

 

Many people’s homes need repairs after a hurricane. That’s when the fraudulent contractors come out hoping to take money without doing any work. Be cautious if a contractor promises fast repairs or asks for full or sizable payment before work is complete. Never give insurance policy numbers or coverage details to anyone you don’t have a contract with. If you’re considering a contractor, ask for licensing and insurance information. Many states have online services to verify licensing. And watch out for a FEMA ”endorsement.” The Federal Emergency Management Agency does not certify contractors.

 

If possible, use a contractor you’ve had a good experience with in the past, or get a recommendation from someone you trust. 

 

Housing Scams

 

If you need temporary or replacement housing, be vigilant about online scams promising a rental only if you act immediately. Never agree to rent a home without seeing it first. Do not disclose bank information, credit card numbers, or other personal information over the phone or internet to hold or reserve anything you have not physically seen and verified.

 

Social Media Misinformation

 

Social media can be beneficial during a hurricane or natural disaster to keep up to date on news and know if loved ones are okay. It can also be a vehicle for fake charities soliciting donations with heart-felt messaging and imagery during natural disasters like Hurricane Ian when people need help. Remember that not everything on social media is true, including charity requests. Double-check any social media solicitations for charitable donations before you give. And be aware that crowd-funding websites do not always vet the people who post campaigns.

 

Other Tips to Protect Yourself

You’ve probably noticed the common theme in many scams that are out in full swing after a hurricane — scammers make up a lie and, unfortunately, an unsuspecting person believes it and provides information that the scammer then uses to steal money, information, or otherwise take advantage. Hurricane or not, there are a few habits to keep you, your data, and your financial assets safe in these situations.

 

  • Beware of unsolicited calls. If someone contacts you out of the blue claiming to represent an organization and asks for your account, financial, or other personal information, hang up immediately.

 

  • Only donate to charities, disaster relief organizations, and insurance companies directly through their public numbers or official website donation portal.

 

  • Delete unexpected or suspicious-looking email messages requesting donations, do not click any links or open any attachments. Scammers use email for phishing and malware attacks.

 

  • Stay connected with the news to keep abreast of recovery efforts. The local news will report if official representatives are in the area. 

 

  • FEMA recommends watching your credit report for unauthorized changes and filing necessary complaints with the Federal Trade Commission through its website IdentityTheft.gov.

 

How to Report Fraud

If you suspect fraud, say something. Speaking up and reporting it helps others from being victims of this type of heartless ugliness. There are several ways to report fraud:

 

 

Stay Safe!

 

Unfortunately, some people take advantage during times of struggle. Whether you’ve been affected or are trying to help those who were, staying aware and vigilant is a good way to help ensure you aren’t taken advantage of. Take care of yourself and each other! 

 

This month we acknowledge Cybersecurity Awareness Month! Follow us on social for more tips/tricks to keep your information and data safe!

 


 

Categories
DashO Change Log

DashO Java Obfuscator Change Log V 11.3 Build 1 – Release Date September 28, 2022

Reading Time: < 1 minute

Enhancements

  • A new option to automatically exclude classes with large methods (larger than 65535 bytes of code after obfuscation) that fail the builds. The option is called “Exclude classes having a method larger than 64K” and adds such classes to the “Global Processing Exclusions” list.
  • A new option to ignore missing entry points.

Changes

  • The ASM Java bytecode manipulation framework library shipped with DashO updated to version 9.3.
  • Apache Groovy library shipped with DashO updated to version 3.0.12.

Fixes

  • Fixed Spring Boot JAR processing.
  • Fixed Spring Boot “Flatten Hierarchy” processing and logging.
Categories
Dotfuscator Pro Change Log

Dotfuscator Professional Edition, Version 6.5.1- Release Date September 22, 2022

Reading Time: < 1 minute

Important Compatibility Changes

  • Dotfuscator distributed as a Nuget package targets .NET 6 instead of previously .NET Core 2.1.
  • Dependencies updated to the newer version of the libraries used by Dotfuscator.
Categories
Support Corner

Support Corner: Protecting .NET Applications That Use Custom Attributes

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Attributes are used for many different things in .NET: unit testing, serialization, language interoperability, etc.

.NET also provides the ability to create custom attributes. This can be used for building our own object mapping (ORM), custom serialization mechanisms, or other distinguishing objects for a specific purpose.

Protecting .NET applications that use custom attributes is a seamless process with Dotfuscator. Dotfuscator cloaks attribute definitions and automatically updates references throughout the application, so the name remains hidden. If the attribute is defined in an external library (not included in obfuscation), Dotfuscator automatically preserves the attribute usage within its inputs. 

This default behavior handles most scenarios involving attributes. But there are times when a custom configuration is necessary. Fortunately, Dotfuscator’s rules engine gives us the flexibility to handle any unique scenario involving custom attributes.

Please consider the following example app:

A custom PermissionRequiredAttribute has been created to distinguish features requiring special permission:

After protecting with Dotfuscator, the PermissionRequiredAttribute, along with all references, are hidden:

Equally as important, the app runtime behavior works properly after protection:

The above scenario works great. But other times, Dotfuscator configuration is required. For example, if PermissionRequiredAttribute is loaded by an external reference not included in obfuscation, we would need a rule to preserve PermissionRequiredAttribute from Renaming. 

In another example, types decorated by PermissionRequiredAttribute are serialized, but the deserialization mechanism is not obfuscated. In this case, rather than excluding the custom attribute itself, we would create a rule to exclude any type (or member) decorated by PermissionsRequiredAttribute:

Custom attributes are yet another powerful component of the .NET platform and, when used effectively, save time and lines of code. Protecting apps that use custom attributes is simple when we take note of the guidelines above.

You can download the complete sample code here.


If you have feedback on this topic or other topics you would like us to discuss in the Support Corner, please feel free to contact our Support Department.